Saturday, November 27

Auckland remains at Level 4 for 2 weeks, with Northland likely to move to Level 3 as of midnight Thursday.


Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says that if the country had not been closed, the number of daily cases could have been around 550.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Chief Health Officer Dr. Ashley Bloomfield update the closure of the Covid 19 Post Office in Beehive.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Chief Health Officer Dr. Ashley Bloomfield update the closure of the Covid 19 Post Office in Beehive.
Photo: Pool Image / Robert Kitchin / Stuff

The cabinet has confirmed that all of New Zealand south of Auckland will move to level 3 starting at 11:59 pm on Tuesday night. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says this will be for at least a week, to be reviewed in Cabinet next week.

Northland will likely join the rest of the country at alert level three starting at 11:59 p.m. Thursday, Ardern says.

The cabinet has also confirmed that Auckland will remain at alert level four until September 14. The cabinet will consider next steps for the region on September 13.

Ardern says Level 4 “is making a difference.”

“The work is not done yet and we have to move on.”

For Auckland and Northland, Ardern says the cases in Warkworth were found at the end of the lockdown and were not equivalent to the cases in Wellington, where the cases were monitored and did not appear to have spread.

“We just haven’t had that level of time for the cases that concern us at Warkworth, and with potential contacts beyond. Once we have the same level of reassurance in Northland, we feel safe to move the alert levels up.

She says the government is awaiting the results of the Northland sewage tests and the tests of people who were in places of interest. If everyone returned clear, Northland could go to alert level 3 at 11:59 p.m. Thursday.

“Just an indication here if all that evidence is clear,” he says.

Ardern says that had New Zealand not moved to alert level 4, estimates of the number of new cases today could have been around 550.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Chief Health Officer Dr. Ashley Bloomfield perform the Covid 19 Post Office Closure Update at the Beehive Theatrette.

The red line on this graph represents what our case numbers would look like if we had not entered a lockdown, says the prime minister.
Photo: Pool Image / Robert Kitchin / Stuff

“The more we do to limit our contact, the faster we will get out of these restrictions,” says Ardern.

“Auckland is doing a great service for all of us. And not just now, but throughout this pandemic. It is Auckland that has kept our gateway to the world, that has done much of the heavy lifting to welcome to get the kiwis home safely, he worked hard to keep the kiwis safe when there was an outbreak. Auckland has done it really hard. “

Ardern says the government is considering new restrictions at level 4 to prevent transmission from occurring in the workplace. “It is a privilege to be open at level 4,” she says.

Vaccine supply

When asked about vaccine supply, Ardern says decisions will have to be made this week on whether New Zealand can continue to expand vaccine delivery beyond what was initially planned by the government.

She says New Zealand has around 840,000 doses of the vaccine in the country and has been receiving around 350,000 each week.

“Our planning has been for the program to deliver 350,000 doses per week. We have the supply and infrastructure to do this sustainably over a long period of time.”

There has been an increase in demand, he says, and the government is working to achieve it, but falling short would simply mean reverting to previous government plans.

“If we can’t do this, the worst case scenario is that we go back to our planned volumes … contrary to reports, we are not running out of vaccines.”

Deputy Health Minister Ayesha Verrall criticized the Bay of Plenty District Board of Health (DHB) after it asked people from the Pacific to show their passports at Covid-19 vaccination appointments.

The DHB apologized last night for the move, acknowledging that it was not DHB’s policy, nor a requirement, and that it had affected trust in their Pacific communities.

When asked about requesting that people bring passports to vaccination appointments, Bloomfield says that everyone is eligible to get vaccinated regardless of immigration status.

He says it was an attempt to smooth the process, as having a form of identification in the absence of a national health identification number can speed it up.

Ardern says healthcare professionals go through a process to ensure that people get their dose and can get a second one, but “there are ways we can do it without any identification.”

“We just want you to get vaccinated, so being physically here is enough. Nothing more.”

Ardern says the government is working both to maintain people’s stocks and to have an increase in vaccines in Auckland.

Vaccine safety

The Independent Covid-19 Vaccine Safety Monitoring Board believes that a woman’s death may have been caused by myocarditis, a rare side effect of the Pfizer vaccine.

Bloomfield says he acknowledges that this will be a concern for some people.

“I want to assure people that the vaccine is much safer than being infected with Covid-19. This is a very rare side effect … we collected very good information on any adverse effects and we are not seeing anything out of the ordinary with this. vaccine compared to what is the experience in other countries.

“The safety profile of this vaccine is very good.”

Ardern notes that the most common cause of myocarditis is a viral infection.

Half of the cases reported yesterday were home transmission

Experts have welcomed signs that the lockdown has been slowing the spread of the Delta variant, and with new case numbers dropping to 53 today, from a high of 83 new cases yesterday, the government will have some confidence. further in your decision to lower alert levels in New Zealand.

Speaking about today’s case numbers, Bloomfield says that while it’s 30 fewer cases than yesterday, it’s just a data point. However, it says that 52 percent of the 83 cases reported yesterday were domiciliary transmission and 72 percent did not generate any new exposure events.

“So of the cases reported yesterday … only 28 percent are considered to have been infectious in the community, which may have simply been a visit to a supermarket … or it may be an essential worker.

He says 101 of the total cases are essential workers, only four of them who have been infectious in the workplace and seven who were infected in the workplace.

All the new cases announced today were detected in Auckland.

Ardern says it is too early to say whether the number of daily cases has peaked.

MIQ availability

Ardern says he does not yet have a timeline for when the government will open new MIQ positions.

“We’ve put that on hold a bit for now … with an outbreak of over 500 people, we are using the facilities for those people and that’s the right thing to do.”

She says that the Crowne Plaza, which is also currently out of service, is also one of the larger facilities.

“It only takes one … it’s really about being vigilant regardless of the number you enter. However, what is clear is that our ability to expand that number is very limited. We just don’t have the workforce to do it.”


www.rnz.co.nz

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